Unplanned time out

It has been a while since I’ve written a blog post on my latest series that covers the locations Evan and his intrepid companions travel through in The Labyrinthine Journey. I promise, I will get back to the series in due course.

Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.
Jim Ryun
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/motivation

Since the Virtual Book Launch (VBL), I have found it difficult to get back into writing, posting articles on my blog and on social networking sites. I am tired. Perhaps a better word is exhausted, and I haven’t been motivated or interested in writing. Working full-time doesn’t help either; early starts and late arriving back home.

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Q & A with Adam Haviaras

On this Hallowed Eve, I am very pleased to introduce you to Adam Haviaras, an archaeologist, who has turned his hand from digging the earth for artefacts to writing stories. Well, he is still a practising archaeologist. Adam has invested his passion for the ancient past and Arthurian lore into writing fiction steeped in history and the supernatural. A perfect subject for the impending Day of the Dead, just watch out for the headless horseman.

Adam and I connected quite a few years back through our shared interest in ancient history, in particular Greece and Rome, and of course mythology. I’ve been following his well written and informative blog Eagles and Dragons Publishing for many years now and if you are interested in Roman history and mythical stories, then I highly recommend you visit Adam’s blog. I reached out to Adam and asked if he wouldn’t mind being interrogated, ahem, I mean interviewed, and was so pleased when he said yes. Here we go…

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VBL Review

GOAL
The main aim of the Virtual Book Launch was to interact with my current readers and to reach out to a new potential audience. Having the event over a 24-hour period was important as I wanted to interact with both local and overseas readers. By restricting my accessibility to a particular time-frame, it would have reduced visibility and sales. As I never had done a VBL, I did not know what to expect or how it would turn out, and had nothing to compare the outcome to. I also wanted to include other Historical Fiction/Fantasy writers to show the diversity of the genre.

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Update on eBook

Hi!

Just as a heads up, a new file has been uploaded onto Amazon of the eBook The Labyrinthine Journey.

If you have ordered a copy of the eBook, you should receive notification from Amazon letting you know about the update.
Thank you

Book Launch Day!

Today is the day!

The Labyrinthine Journey is now available to buy.

eBooks can be purchased from: Amazon
For all other eBook formats: Smashwords

If you haven’t already joined my FB event, click on the image below to join in the fun:

Follow Evan as he continues his odyssey as Servant of the Gods in The Labyrinthine Journey. The quest to locate the sacred object adds pressure to the uneasy alliance between Evan and the Atlanteans. His inability to accept the world he’s in, and his constant battle with Zeus, both threaten to derail the expedition and his life.

Traversing the mountainous terrain of the Peloponnese and Corinthian Gulf to the centre of the spiritual world, Evan meets with Pythia, Oracle of Delphi. Her cryptic prophecy reveals much more than he expected; something that changes his concept of the ancient world and his former way of life.

Will Evan and his friends succeed in their quest to find the relics and stop the advent of Christianity?

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, likes to meander between contemporary life to the realms of mythology and history. Luciana has always been interested in Mythology and Ancient History but her passion wasn’t realised until seeing the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. From then on, she was inspired to write Historical Fantasy.

She has spent many lessons promoting literature and the merits of ancient history. Today, you will still find Luciana in the classroom, teaching ancient history and promoting literature. To keep up-to-date with her ramblings, ahem, that is meaningful discourse, subscribe to her mailing list at http://www.luccav.com.

Upcoming Events Author Linnea Tanner

My good friend and talented author of award winning novel, Apollo’s Raven will be one of the guest authors featuring on my virtual book launch on the 1 October, and the publication of my latest book The Labyrinthine Journey.

Here is her blog article where you can connect with Linnea, Upcoming Events.

And to join us on the VBL, click on the image below.
It would be great see you there, plus there are plenty of giveaways and great competitions.

See you there.
Luciana

Corruption, sex and St. Paul

After leaving Messene, Evan and his companions head north towards the Corinthian Gulf. However, the trip wasn’t without a few incidents: an altercation with a Mycenaean princess and her ignoble father, and a sword fight with brigands, in which Evan was seriously injured. In any case, the group eventually arrive in Corinth, a city St. Paul in 51CE, had preached to and pleaded Christian unity. Why did St. Paul go to Corinth? Aside from stamping out “paganism” and converting pagans to Christianity, Corinth was considered a sinful city.

Apollo Temple has been built in Doric style on the ruins of earlier temple, being a good example of peripteral temple, supported by 38 columns, only 7 of which are still in place.
By Chris Oxford at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44688121

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How a city rose from the ashes

Evan and his companions leave Pylos and head to Messenia, a region protected by mountains.

Ancient Messenia is located in the southwestern part of the Peloponnese, and founded in 369 BCE. The site was settled in the Early Bronze Age, though it may date back to the Late Neolithic period. Today the site is protected under the World Heritage foundation. You may be wondering why Messenia is an important site. The ancient Messenians were subjugated by their fellow Greeks, perhaps not a new concept as recent history can attest, but it was certainly wasn’t the norm.

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