What did the Phoenicians eat?

Origins
The Phoenicians lived in northern ancient Canaan, where Lebanon is today. They were considered to be Canaanites, yet recent DNA evidence of Modern Lebanese, a study conducted by the National Geographic,  suggest they came from an ancient Mediterranean sub-stratum. What does this mean? The results showed their bloodline are of mixed origin and were not indigenous to the area. It could be the Phoenicians were related to the ‘sea people’, having migrated in the 3rd millennium BCE and mixed with the local Canaanites and hence the Phoenician line was born. You can read more here.

Phoenician trade routes Image courtesy of Wikipedia

Phoenician trade routes
Image courtesy of Wikipedia

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Goodbye 2016

I thought it was time to reflect on the year that was 2016. I haven’t written an article as such before, so here we go. 2016 was a roller-coaster and so to close the year out, here are some pivotal events that happened.

The year started very promising, I had started a new job and was working in two schools. It was hectic going from one school to the other, but I made it work. My new line-manager then offered extra days, which meant resigning from the other school. That was fine as I was travelling an hour and half each way to get there.

header-the-year-that-was

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What happened to the Minoans?

‘Empires inevitably fall, and when they do, history judges them for the legacies they leave behind.’ Noah Feldman

The Minoans left us with an enormous legacy, their extraordinary feats dazzle and confound us to this day. Yet in spite of their sea power, engineering marvels, sophisticated society and interactions with neighbouring and far-reaching civilisations, they could not prevent their eventual demise. Regardless of the multitude of times they rebuilt their mega cities, the Minoan race could not withstand the ultimate test of natural disasters and invasions.

minoan-artwork

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Architectural genius

The Palace of Knossos would have to be one of the most amazing ancient sites I was fortunate to see. Built around 2000 BCE, and the largest of structures on Crete, it was the main power and pivotal centre of Minoan culture. The first palaces (Knossos, Mallia, Phaistos, Hagia Triada and Zakro) were destroyed by an earthquake circa 1730 BCE and rebuilt around 1650 BCE. The palaces withstood a series of earthquakes, and it wasn’t until the cataclysmic volcanic eruption at Thera and subsequent invasion of the Mycenaeans, that saw the demise of these extraordinary people and culture.

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Minoan Seafarers

Greece has over 3,000 islands, some inhabitable, most are not. Crete, the largest island of them all, had an advantage over the others with its vast cypress forest, most of which is gone today. Ship building began very early. There is evidence to suggest trade in the Aegean began as early as 6,800 BCE. Tools made from Melian obsidian (from the island of Melos) has been found on Crete and Cyprus. In prehistoric times, the islands were accessible by means of primitive boats due to the narrow sea passages and shallow gulfs (see article by Andrea Salimbeti). However, for the purpose of this article, I will be referring to ships most of us are familiar with, and those featured in the Akrotiri wall frieze.

map_aegean2

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Book Trailer Exclusive

Today I am posting something a little different from the usual articles.

As loyal followers of my blog, I want to share an exclusive preview with you for my book Search for the Golden Serpent. This is the first of a three part series.

Thank you for your continued support and I look forward to your comments on my book trailer.

Purchase your copy of Search for the Golden SerpentAmazon UK | Amazon US | Barnes & Noble | Createspace | Kobo | Smashwords

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, burnt out but not done… yet. Subscribe and receive a free PDF on how to survive 7th century BCE http://eepurl.com/brIbFf

 

 

5,000-year-old tablet shows Mesopotamian workers paid in beer

At least the workers were merry after being paid!
This is what I love about ancient history. You come across little treasures of information like this.

Ancientfoods

IMG_1232Original article

ca.finance.yahoo.com

Beer. It’s not the most ideal payment to take home in exchange for a day’s work: it might spill, it could get warm, it might get polluted with dirt, dust and whatever insects are drawn to the sweet nectar while on the road, or you might not make it home at all.
But employers in the ancient Mesopotamian city of Uruk, located in modern-day Iraq, certainly knew how to treat their workers to a good time.

A roughly 5,000-year-old cuneiform stone tablet, in possession of the British Museum in London, shows how workers were paid their daily rations in liquid gold.
According to the New Scientist the tablet is the world’s oldest paycheck.
“On one tablet excavated from (Uruk) we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning ‘ration,’ and a conical vessel, meaning ‘beer,’” writes the New Scientist’s Alison George.
“Scattered around are scratches…

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