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5 Tips for the intrepid time traveller

I was thinking about what to write about for this week’s blog post, and decided that tips to survive the ancient world would be helpful. You just never what will happen and you could find yourself in a place or time without a few essentials. With that in mind, I’ve put a list together.

7 Quotes from Plato That Will Inspire

Plato features in my second book The Labyrinthine Journey, and it was his dialogues Critias and Timaeus, that inspired the premise of my story and the enduring legend of Atlantis.

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Plato from the School of Athens by Raphael, 1509 Wikipedia

Book Review

I have just finished reading The Honourable Thief by Meaghan Wilson Anastasios. It took me four months to finish it, not because it wasn’t interesting, more due to decluttering the house, getting it painted and ready for sale, selling and then moving. In between all that, going to work, keeping up with family commitments, trying to keep up with my writing (failed so far this year), and having a life. It has been a big year so far.

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Perth, Evan’s home

I haven’t as yet written about my main character, Evan (Evandros, as he is known in back in Ancient Greece) Chronis’ home, where he is from in the twenty-first century. Oddly enough, it is where I currently live ;D I grew up in a country town, but have made Perth my home now for about 25 years. It’s also where I teach.

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FYI, I taught in Manjimup for a few years https://www.lonelyplanet.com/australia/western-australia

Change is good… though stressful

Well, we’ve just moved house. I can tell you from experience, Winter is not the best time to move. It rained while we were packing our cars and when the removalists came. Thankfully, the rain stopped for a while, and held off when we arrived at our new house. It is only a temporary stay as we are renting until we find a house we really love and want to buy.

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The joys of reading

I grew up in a small country town and we didn’t have a lot of money, so I used to borrow books from our very tiny public library. I started my reading journey with Enid Blyton books, The Famous Five and The Secret Seven, then I moved onto Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys. Rather predictable for a kid who enjoyed reading mysteries and used to think I could solve crimes too. Then I was given for a birthday the first book in the Trixie Belden series, again a teen sleuth who couldn’t keep out of trouble or sticking her nose in events that had nothing to do with her. I had fun reading them. Bought the next in the series when I had the money or given as a Christmas gift.

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So, where have I been?

It has been a long time since my last my post, and while it was quite the hiatus, it was not my intention to be away for over two months. Yes, over two months. I have missed our blogging community as I haven’t been able to catch up on any of the blog posts that I read either! Very frustrating and disappointing. You would not believe the amount of blog posts I have sitting in my inbox that are waiting for me to read and comment on. I will explain where I have been and why I haven’t posted anything on my blog.

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Blog Hop – Survival of the Fittest

My good friend and writer, Jacqui Murray, is launching her newest book in the series The Crossroads Trilogy. I am happy to present to you today, information and details of Book 1, Survival of the Fittest. I am looking very much to reading Jacqui’s latest tome, and judging by the cover, and having read the blurb and the chapter sample, its looks to be an amazing read.

Enough from me, go ahead and peruse!

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Most scientists believe Homo erectus couldn’t talk. How did Xhosa and her People communicate?

These early humans were highly intelligent for their day and possessed rich communication skills but rarely verbal. Most paleoanthropologists believe that the ‘speaking’ part of their brain wasn’t evolved enough for speech but there’s another reason: Talking is noisy as well as unnatural in nature which attracts attention. For these early humans, who were far from the alpha in the food chain, being noticed wasn’t good.

Instead, they communicated with gestures, facial expressions, movements, and all the body language we-all still use but rarely recognize. They talked to each other about everything necessary, just non-verbally.