5 handy tips to survive the Ancient World

While Evan, the main character in Search for the Golden Serpent, was dumped in the middle of a shipwreck, he had no clue as to his location. That is, until he saw the ship that rescued him, and his first foray at the port of Hippo Regius. 

It was a bit of a culture shock, well a big one, being on a wooden ship and surrounded by bearded and well-season sailors, who spoke in a foreign language. Having no fresh water to drink, or regular showers! Cleanliness had a different outlook, as did fresh clothes. In any case, Evan was forced to adapt, though he did not do it gracefully or without a few unsavoury words and phrases.

In view of this, I have put together 5 hand tips in case you get stuck in the ancient world!

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All aboard! Ship leaving port…

This is the final leg of the journey Evan and his intrepid adventurers embark on. The images I have chosen for this short PPT wasn’t easy. I have amassed some amazing photos, paintings, and maps over the number of years to help me write the Search for the Golden Serpent. The ones I have selected have been inspirational, helping me visualise what the locations must have been like at the time, and the first image was used for my book launch in 2015.

megaron

Megaron at Pylos

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Pack your water bottle, you are going to need it

For our next leg of the journey, get comfy and pour yourself a drink, we’re about to set off to Egypt.

Evan isn’t quite happy about being stuck in the ancient world and does his utmost to let dear ole dad, Zeus, know about it. In any case, he visits Carthage, rescues his Atlantean companions, and travels to Memphis. Oh… and he gets nabbed by a harpy and is saved by a goddess!

So let’s get into it!

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Images and inspiration to write

I’ve been contemplating a new series for my blog, and coming up short with ideas. Then I had little brainwave, I wanted to show some of my favourite images that relate to the places mentioned in my books. Some I have been to, others I haven’t travelled to as yet and are on my ever-growing bucket-list. I definitely need two life-times, one isn’t enough to do all that I’d like!

thought-2123970_640

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Symbols of Easter older than Christianity

Everyone is familiar with the Easter egg and bunny, well its commercial aspect, thanks to chocolate companies creating all shapes of eggs and bunnies for the almighty dollar. Not the Almighty God in this case. Most of us would have had our fair share of purchasing and consuming the confectionery items. But where did these iconic figures come from and what is their true meaning?

Commons Free image

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Mistranslation altered meaning of ancient festival

Some years ago, when I was researching about Pandora for my short story collection Accursed Women, I learnt there was an error in translation of a word. The significance of that mistranslation changed the way in which the myth was told and, subsequent interpretations through art and spin off stories. You can read about my blog post here: Idle curiosity of malicious intent. While researching about the origins of Easter, I learnt (many of you may already know this) that the Greek word ‘Pascha’ meaning Passover was mistranslated as Easter.

Das, Vraja Bihari (2018). Power of Traditions. Yoga for Modern Age. http://yogaformodernage.com/power-of-traditions/#prettyphoto/0/

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Pagan roots of Easter

For those who have been following my blog know I am historian with a specialist interest and knowledge in ancient history. So, the content of this article may not come to you as a surprise. As today is Good Friday, I thought it would be an opportunity to write about the origins of this Holy event beginning with resurrection.

The Return of Persephone, c.1891 (oil on canvas) by Leighton, Frederic (1830-96); 203×152 cm; Leeds Museums and Galleries (City Art Gallery) U.K.; English, out of copyright

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Warning: don’t mess with the fairer sex!

Our next destination has a unique history, and perhaps the earliest forerunner of women’s liberation. Then again, what happened may raise a few brows and possibly considered extreme as to the outcome. We are off to the Island of Hephaistos/Hephaestus, today known as Limnos/Lemnos. It is one of the northern islands of Greece and not far from the Hellespont, the Dardenelles in Turkey, the famous trade route between the west and east, and also where Troy was situated.

From Google maps

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Dangerous, yet beautiful

Our next port of call is the Cycladic island, Santorini. I’ve been fortunate to go there twice and I still remember how excited I was the first time I went. It was research for my series, Servant of the Gods, but it was so much more. I wanted to see Akrotiri, the Bronze Age city that was buried when the volcano erupted but unfortunately it was closed to the public. I was so disappointed. I had travelled from Australia specially to see it, and I never got to step a foot near the place. I did later hear when I returned to Perth that someone, a tourist, was injured at the site.

Santorini Map and Travel Guide
BY C. H. KWAK
Courtesy of https://www.tripsavvy.com/santorini-map-and-travel-guide-4135202

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