Upcoming Events Author Linnea Tanner

My good friend and talented author of award winning novel, Apollo’s Raven will be one of the guest authors featuring on my virtual book launch on the 1 October, and the publication of my latest book The Labyrinthine Journey.

Here is her blog article where you can connect with Linnea, Upcoming Events.

And to join us on the VBL, click on the image below.
It would be great see you there, plus there are plenty of giveaways and great competitions.

See you there.
Luciana

5,000-year-old tablet shows Mesopotamian workers paid in beer

At least the workers were merry after being paid!
This is what I love about ancient history. You come across little treasures of information like this.

Ancientfoods

IMG_1232Original article

ca.finance.yahoo.com

Beer. It’s not the most ideal payment to take home in exchange for a day’s work: it might spill, it could get warm, it might get polluted with dirt, dust and whatever insects are drawn to the sweet nectar while on the road, or you might not make it home at all.
But employers in the ancient Mesopotamian city of Uruk, located in modern-day Iraq, certainly knew how to treat their workers to a good time.

A roughly 5,000-year-old cuneiform stone tablet, in possession of the British Museum in London, shows how workers were paid their daily rations in liquid gold.
According to the New Scientist the tablet is the world’s oldest paycheck.
“On one tablet excavated from (Uruk) we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning ‘ration,’ and a conical vessel, meaning ‘beer,’” writes the New Scientist’s Alison George.
“Scattered around are scratches…

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Legend and Lore continued (History of the Rose )

I thought this was such a lovely and fascinating post about the origins of roses and wanted to share it with you.

Ritaroberts's Blog

The rose, cultivated for well over 3,000 years and known from time immemorial as the queen of the flowers, is thought to have originated in Asia Minor. The genus name Rosa is derived from the Greek word rodon , meaning ‘red’. The ancient Persians, Egyptians, Greeks and Romans used the rose not only as a garden ornamental but also as the main ingredient in various perfumes and cosmetics. In Greece and Rome, the rose was the favourite flower of  the goddess of the flowers, the Greek chloris and her Roman counterpart Flora. In festivals for these goddesses, the people bedecked themselves and their animals  with flowers, using mostly roses. At Roman banquets roses were used lavishly for decoration and were even strewn on the floor. At the same banquets, the diners often wore rose garlands as a preventative against drunkenness.

In Greek myth, Chloris was said to have created the…

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How Pompeii brought ancient Roman wine back to life

How cool is this? Love try it when it becomes available.

Ancientfoods

Roman wine being brought back to life in Pompeii. Photo: Piero Mastrobeardino Roman wine being brought back to life in Pompeii. Photo: Piero Mastrobeardino

Roman remains litter the closely-grown vines. Photo: Mastrobeardino Roman remains litter the closely-grown vines. Photo: Mastrobeardino

Original Article:

the local.it

Feb 2016

Made from ancient grape varieties grown in Pompeii, ‘Villa dei Misteri’ has to be one of the world’s most exclusive wines.

The grapes are planted in exactly the same position, grown using identical techniques and grow from the same soil the city’s wine-makers exploited until Vesuvius buried the city and its inhabitants in AD 79.

In the late 1800s, archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli first excavated some of the city’s vineyards from beneath three metres of solid ash.

The digs turned up an almost perfect snapshot of ancient wine-growing – and thirteen petrified corpses, huddled against a wall.

Casts were made of the bodies, as well as the vines and the surviving segments of trellises on which they were growing.

But archaeologists didn’t think to restore…

View original post 491 more words

Reblog – British Kings Atrebates

I’ve been following Linnea Tanner’s blog for a number of years now and am a avid fan of her work. Her blog is dedicated to the ancient history of the British Celts and of Rome’s invasion and subsequent impact the Roman Empire had on the various tribes. It is one of the most informative and well written blogs I have read and I look forward to each post Linnea writes.

If you enjoy ancient history and in particular the British Celts, I suggest you do read her blog and follow.

Here’s a snippet of her introduction and the link to her blog post.


Introduction

Julius Caesar described the tribes in southeast Britain as being similar to Gaul (modern day France). He mentioned that some of the tribal names in Britain were identical as those in Gaul, but does not specify these. Much of the population was divided into named units in the order of tens of thousands of people which were called civitates, usually translated as ‘tribes’ or ‘states’.

httpwww-linneatanner-comblogbritish-kings-atrebatesrespond

 

Romans used non-stick cookware 2,000 years ago

This is such a fascinating read, I had to share it with you. I just love archaeology and the incredible finds.

Ancientfoods

The discovery of a Roman pottery dump near Naples has revealed that the Romans used non-stick pans. Archaeologists unearthed fragments of pots with a thick, red, slippery coating (pictured), which are thought to have been used to cook meaty stews some 2,000 years ago Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3515952/Sorry-Tefal-Romans-used-non-stick-cookware-2-000-years-ago-Cumanae-testae-slippery-coating-stop-stews-sticking.html#ixzz492npLaQS Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook The discovery of a Roman pottery dump near Naples has revealed that the Romans used non-stick pans. Archaeologists unearthed fragments of pots with a thick, red, slippery coating (pictured), which are thought to have been used to cook meaty stews some 2,000 years ago

It was first suggested that the Romans cut down on their washing up by using non-stick pans in a first-century cookbook entitled De Re Coquinaria. A millstone was also found at the site (pictured), perhaps buried as an offering the the gods It was first suggested that the Romans cut down on their washing up by using non-stick pans in a first-century cookbook entitled De Re Coquinaria. A millstone was also found at the site (pictured), perhaps buried as an offering the the gods

Original Article:

By SARAH GRIFFITHS

dailymail.co.uk

the Romans used non-stick cookware 2,000 years ago: ‘Cumanae testae’ has slippery coating to stop stews sticking
Fragments of pots with a thick, red, slippery coating unearthed near Naples
Said to be those of Cumanae testae – non-stick pottery used by the Romans
Existence was first seen in a Roman cookbook and has now been proved
Tests will…

View original post 593 more words