Warning: don’t mess with the fairer sex!

Our next destination has a unique history, and perhaps the earliest forerunner of women’s liberation. Then again, what happened may raise a few brows and possibly considered extreme as to the outcome. We are off to the Island of Hephaistos/Hephaestus, today known as Limnos/Lemnos. It is one of the northern islands of Greece and not far from the Hellespont, the Dardenelles in Turkey, the famous trade route between the west and east, and also where Troy was situated.

From Google maps

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Book Launch Day!

Today is the day!

The Labyrinthine Journey is now available to buy.

eBooks can be purchased from: Amazon
For all other eBook formats: Smashwords

If you haven’t already joined my FB event, click on the image below to join in the fun:

Follow Evan as he continues his odyssey as Servant of the Gods in The Labyrinthine Journey. The quest to locate the sacred object adds pressure to the uneasy alliance between Evan and the Atlanteans. His inability to accept the world he’s in, and his constant battle with Zeus, both threaten to derail the expedition and his life.

Traversing the mountainous terrain of the Peloponnese and Corinthian Gulf to the centre of the spiritual world, Evan meets with Pythia, Oracle of Delphi. Her cryptic prophecy reveals much more than he expected; something that changes his concept of the ancient world and his former way of life.

Will Evan and his friends succeed in their quest to find the relics and stop the advent of Christianity?

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, likes to meander between contemporary life to the realms of mythology and history. Luciana has always been interested in Mythology and Ancient History but her passion wasn’t realised until seeing the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. From then on, she was inspired to write Historical Fantasy.

She has spent many lessons promoting literature and the merits of ancient history. Today, you will still find Luciana in the classroom, teaching ancient history and promoting literature. To keep up-to-date with her ramblings, ahem, that is meaningful discourse, subscribe to her mailing list at http://www.luccav.com.

How a city rose from the ashes

Evan and his companions leave Pylos and head to Messenia, a region protected by mountains.

Ancient Messenia is located in the southwestern part of the Peloponnese, and founded in 369 BCE. The site was settled in the Early Bronze Age, though it may date back to the Late Neolithic period. Today the site is protected under the World Heritage foundation. You may be wondering why Messenia is an important site. The ancient Messenians were subjugated by their fellow Greeks, perhaps not a new concept as recent history can attest, but it was certainly wasn’t the norm.

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Book Trailer Exclusive

Today I am posting something a little different from the usual articles.

As loyal followers of my blog, I want to share an exclusive preview with you for my book Search for the Golden Serpent. This is the first of a three part series.

Thank you for your continued support and I look forward to your comments on my book trailer.

Purchase your copy of Search for the Golden SerpentAmazon UK | Amazon US | Barnes & Noble | Createspace | Kobo | Smashwords

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, burnt out but not done… yet. Subscribe and receive a free PDF on how to survive 7th century BCE http://eepurl.com/brIbFf

 

 

Middle Eastern influences?

While researching for my series Servant of the Gods, I read articles and watched documentaries in reference to the origins of the Greek gods and goddesses. And while some originated in Ancient Greece, many of the divinities were “borrowed” from neighbouring countries such as Asia Minor, the Middle East and from the Minoans. But were the goddesses and gods of Minoan mythology a natural development or were they also taken from elsewhere?

The Council of Gods Raphael (1517-18) Courtesy of Wikipedia

The Council of Gods
Raphael (1517-18)
Courtesy of Wikipedia

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Island Nations

The Minoans came from one place—Crete—as far as evidence shows, yet their influence stretches across the Aegean to mainland Greece. The reconstruction of the palaces at Pylos, Tiryns and Mycenae show similar structural features as did the artwork. The confluence of such occurrences was a result of trade which the Minoans were renowned. The fame of the three city-states mentioned was due to Homer and his tale of the Iliad. The era he spoke of 1300 BCE was 500 years before his time and the three cities were no longer in power.

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The Lost Years

In a number posts I’ve mentioned the similarities between Plato’s Atlantis, the island of Thira/Santorini and the Minoans. In my research for my series Servant of the Gods, my focus was on the Atlantean myth. I love researching and looking for information which would help with writing my story. In the course of my sleuthing there has been a myriad of theories put forward as to where Atlantis was but not the fallout for the people. Who were they and what became of them after the destruction of their home?

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The Search for Atlantis

Plato’s Atlantis was the precursor to his epic and quantifiable exposition The Republic, a discourse on the ideal society. How government should run, the election of public servants, the laws and the behaviour of its citizens—men. Women were mentioned but weren’t considered as major players in workings of the social order. So was Plato writing about a civilisation that once existed or did he make it all up to create a moralistic story? It is this driving quest that has stirred the imaginations of storytellers and historians for hundreds of years. Was Atlantis a real place?

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Where did the year go?

It’s hard to believe but the first anniversary of Accursed Women is fast approaching. A lot has happened since 30 November 2013, high and low events. The greatest achievement was the publication of Accursed Women. The book launch was a wonderful success with support from family, friends and people I hadn’t met before. It had a positive vibe and great energy. I was buzzing and so was the room full of guests.

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Fatal Lust, Fatal Consequences

‘What is left when honour is lost?’
Publilius Syrus

To love and be loved is the greatest desire every person hopes to have. It is human nature, written in our DNA since the conception of people. The image of stone-age man dragging a female by her hair, whether correct hypothesis or not, is a scene a few may recognise. The point is love is an illogical emotion, it makes people do things they may not normally do. Maslow understood this as he ranked it as number 3 on his hierarchy of need:

• Social Needs – belongingness, affection and love, – from work group, family, friends, romantic relationships.

He believed people are ‘motivated to achieve certain needs’ and when you succeed that level you move onto the next. So was Paris motivated by need or the desire to possess the most beautiful woman in the world?

Enrique Simonet (1866–1927)  Spanish: El juicio de Paris The Judgement of Paris The painting shows the Judgment of Paris, an event in Greek mythology. Figures, from left to right: The goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite, then Aphrodite's son, Eros, and Paris. 1904 Museum of Málaga  Wikimedia

Enrique Simonet (1866–1927)
Spanish: El juicio de Paris
The Judgement of Paris
The painting shows the Judgment of Paris, an event in Greek mythology. Figures, from left to right: The goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite, then Aphrodite’s son, Eros, and Paris.
1904
Museum of Málaga
Wikimedia

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