The birthplace of democracy – Athens

I have been fortunate to visit Athens twice, and though the second time was just a day trip, I was still excited to spend time there. I first went to Athens in 2004, the year in which the modern Olympics returned to Greece in over a hundred years. There was so much going on and travelling from the airport on the bus into the city, there was rubble, construction and mayhem everywhere. I did wonder whether the Greeks would be ready for the onslaught of athletes and spectators that were soon to arrive on their shores. Speaking with the locals, there was no doubt they’d be ready and on time for the big opening; and they were! It was a spectacular. I wasn’t there for the Olympics, and in fact it was better, as I didn’t need to wait in line to go to venues or places to eat.

Nineteenth-century painting by Philipp Foltz depicting the Athenian politician Pericles delivering his famous funeral oration in front of the Assembly http://www.ancientgreekbattles.net/…/Pericles.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7725777

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Demeter’s town

To continue with the blog series (that is hiccupping along!) I had begun last year. Click here to have a quick refresher of the infographic I created as an overview of the locations featured in my book The Labyrinthine Journey. In this post, we will be heading to Eleusis, renowned for the ‘mysteries’, and where the legend of Demeter and Persephone was ignited.

Map of Eleusis. Heritage management http://www2.aueb.gr/heritage/260.php

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Unplanned time out

It has been a while since I’ve written a blog post on my latest series that covers the locations Evan and his intrepid companions travel through in The Labyrinthine Journey. I promise, I will get back to the series in due course.

Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.
Jim Ryun
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/motivation

Since the Virtual Book Launch (VBL), I have found it difficult to get back into writing, posting articles on my blog and on social networking sites. I am tired. Perhaps a better word is exhausted, and I haven’t been motivated or interested in writing. Working full-time doesn’t help either; early starts and late arriving back home.

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Update on eBook

Hi!

Just as a heads up, a new file has been uploaded onto Amazon of the eBook The Labyrinthine Journey.

If you have ordered a copy of the eBook, you should receive notification from Amazon letting you know about the update.
Thank you

Book Launch Day!

Today is the day!

The Labyrinthine Journey is now available to buy.

eBooks can be purchased from: Amazon
For all other eBook formats: Smashwords

If you haven’t already joined my FB event, click on the image below to join in the fun:

Follow Evan as he continues his odyssey as Servant of the Gods in The Labyrinthine Journey. The quest to locate the sacred object adds pressure to the uneasy alliance between Evan and the Atlanteans. His inability to accept the world he’s in, and his constant battle with Zeus, both threaten to derail the expedition and his life.

Traversing the mountainous terrain of the Peloponnese and Corinthian Gulf to the centre of the spiritual world, Evan meets with Pythia, Oracle of Delphi. Her cryptic prophecy reveals much more than he expected; something that changes his concept of the ancient world and his former way of life.

Will Evan and his friends succeed in their quest to find the relics and stop the advent of Christianity?

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, likes to meander between contemporary life to the realms of mythology and history. Luciana has always been interested in Mythology and Ancient History but her passion wasn’t realised until seeing the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. From then on, she was inspired to write Historical Fantasy.

She has spent many lessons promoting literature and the merits of ancient history. Today, you will still find Luciana in the classroom, teaching ancient history and promoting literature. To keep up-to-date with her ramblings, ahem, that is meaningful discourse, subscribe to her mailing list at http://www.luccav.com.

Eat and drink with the Ancient Greeks

Like their ancient Egyptian cousins, the ancient Greeks recorded much of what they did on vases, sculptures and in print. I, for one, am very grateful for the information they left behind as it enabled me to research and learn what they ate. It was fascinating to read how much hasn’t really changed in the way food is prepared and used. Bread, wine and olives, and olive oil, formed the basis of their diet, to which today, most cultures still eat and drink.

Female baker taking bread from the oven.
early 5th century BC
Louvre Museum
Source/Photographer Marie-Lan Nguyen (2009)
Wikimedia Commons

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What did the Phoenicians eat?

Origins
The Phoenicians lived in northern ancient Canaan, where Lebanon is today. They were considered to be Canaanites, yet recent DNA evidence of Modern Lebanese, a study conducted by the National Geographic,  suggest they came from an ancient Mediterranean sub-stratum. What does this mean? The results showed their bloodline are of mixed origin and were not indigenous to the area. It could be the Phoenicians were related to the ‘sea people’, having migrated in the 3rd millennium BCE and mixed with the local Canaanites and hence the Phoenician line was born. You can read more here.

Phoenician trade routes Image courtesy of Wikipedia

Phoenician trade routes
Image courtesy of Wikipedia

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Reblog – British Kings Atrebates

I’ve been following Linnea Tanner’s blog for a number of years now and am a avid fan of her work. Her blog is dedicated to the ancient history of the British Celts and of Rome’s invasion and subsequent impact the Roman Empire had on the various tribes. It is one of the most informative and well written blogs I have read and I look forward to each post Linnea writes.

If you enjoy ancient history and in particular the British Celts, I suggest you do read her blog and follow.

Here’s a snippet of her introduction and the link to her blog post.


Introduction

Julius Caesar described the tribes in southeast Britain as being similar to Gaul (modern day France). He mentioned that some of the tribal names in Britain were identical as those in Gaul, but does not specify these. Much of the population was divided into named units in the order of tens of thousands of people which were called civitates, usually translated as ‘tribes’ or ‘states’.

httpwww-linneatanner-comblogbritish-kings-atrebatesrespond

 

Ch… ch… changes

I want to apologise to my wonderful and loyal readers for my absence. It wasn’t by choice, rather circumstances have intervened and as a result, I haven’t been posting as often as I’d like. I will continue the series on the Minoans, as they are fascinating and are the premise for the trilogy I am writing, but first I want to fill you as to what has been happening.

Courtesy of This is a good sign website http://thisisagoodsign.com/change/

Courtesy of This is a good sign website
http://thisisagoodsign.com/change/

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