Sacred centre of Ancient Greece

Evan and his companions leave Corinth to go to Delphi so they can meet with Pythia, who has information regarding the sacred relic. This is according to the information Evan was given by a chance encounter with a mysterious woman. To get to central Greece, they need to hire a boat to sail across the Gulf of Corinth and this is where they meet Jason and his crew, the Argonauts.

Ruins of the ancient Temple of Apollo at Delphi, overlooking the valley of Phocis.
By Skyring – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64170779

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Book Launch Day!

Today is the day!

The Labyrinthine Journey is now available to buy.

eBooks can be purchased from: Amazon
For all other eBook formats: Smashwords

If you haven’t already joined my FB event, click on the image below to join in the fun:

Follow Evan as he continues his odyssey as Servant of the Gods in The Labyrinthine Journey. The quest to locate the sacred object adds pressure to the uneasy alliance between Evan and the Atlanteans. His inability to accept the world he’s in, and his constant battle with Zeus, both threaten to derail the expedition and his life.

Traversing the mountainous terrain of the Peloponnese and Corinthian Gulf to the centre of the spiritual world, Evan meets with Pythia, Oracle of Delphi. Her cryptic prophecy reveals much more than he expected; something that changes his concept of the ancient world and his former way of life.

Will Evan and his friends succeed in their quest to find the relics and stop the advent of Christianity?

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, likes to meander between contemporary life to the realms of mythology and history. Luciana has always been interested in Mythology and Ancient History but her passion wasn’t realised until seeing the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. From then on, she was inspired to write Historical Fantasy.

She has spent many lessons promoting literature and the merits of ancient history. Today, you will still find Luciana in the classroom, teaching ancient history and promoting literature. To keep up-to-date with her ramblings, ahem, that is meaningful discourse, subscribe to her mailing list at http://www.luccav.com.

Architectural genius

The Palace of Knossos would have to be one of the most amazing ancient sites I was fortunate to see. Built around 2000 BCE, and the largest of structures on Crete, it was the main power and pivotal centre of Minoan culture. The first palaces (Knossos, Mallia, Phaistos, Hagia Triada and Zakro) were destroyed by an earthquake circa 1730 BCE and rebuilt around 1650 BCE. The palaces withstood a series of earthquakes, and it wasn’t until the cataclysmic volcanic eruption at Thera and subsequent invasion of the Mycenaeans, that saw the demise of these extraordinary people and culture.

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Book Trailer Exclusive

Today I am posting something a little different from the usual articles.

As loyal followers of my blog, I want to share an exclusive preview with you for my book Search for the Golden Serpent. This is the first of a three part series.

Thank you for your continued support and I look forward to your comments on my book trailer.

Purchase your copy of Search for the Golden SerpentAmazon UK | Amazon US | Barnes & Noble | Createspace | Kobo | Smashwords

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, burnt out but not done… yet. Subscribe and receive a free PDF on how to survive 7th century BCE http://eepurl.com/brIbFf

 

 

Female deity reigns

A predominant feature of Minoan culture was their affiliation with nature and the worship of a female goddess. Through their art, archaeologists have been able to identify the multiple roles the goddess represented. The Minoans also worshipped a male god, represented by the bull and the sun otherwise known as the ‘Earthshaker’. In later mythology, this was linked to Poseidon, Greek god of the sea, and the bull was his symbol as were horses. He did after all gift King Minos with a white bull to sacrifice in exchange for rulership of Crete and surrounding islands. For those familiar with the myth will know the outcome of the decision King Minos made by not sacrificing the bull to Poseidon.

Minoan Snake Goddess Heraklion Museum Courtesy of Wikipedia

Minoan Snake Goddess
Heraklion Museum
Courtesy of Wikipedia

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Island Nations

The Minoans came from one place—Crete—as far as evidence shows, yet their influence stretches across the Aegean to mainland Greece. The reconstruction of the palaces at Pylos, Tiryns and Mycenae show similar structural features as did the artwork. The confluence of such occurrences was a result of trade which the Minoans were renowned. The fame of the three city-states mentioned was due to Homer and his tale of the Iliad. The era he spoke of 1300 BCE was 500 years before his time and the three cities were no longer in power.

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In the beginning…

For my next series, I’ll be delving into the world of the Minoans but before I get into this amazing civilisation I’d like to explain why. Many of you following my blog would know back in May, I published a novel called Search for the Golden Serpent. One reviewer wrote:

“This is a tale of a modern-day hero’s adventure through time travel and to ancient sites such as Atlantis, Thebes and Pylos.” Linnea Tanner

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So long, and thanks for all the fish

I couldn’t resist borrowing Douglas Adams’ title of the fourth book of his series Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy for this blog post. Brilliant books if you haven’t read them. Apt too, as the dolphins leave planet Earth knowing it was fated to be destroyed long before the humans cottoned on. This makes me wonder whether the Atlanteans got warnings as to what would happen if they continued to behave contrary to the gods’ structured tenets? If they had, in what form did the warnings come? The final act of the gods was finite and the effects impacted many cultures. This is why I believe Plato took his main premise of the story from the eruption of Thera and subsequent dissolution of the Minoan culture.

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What can we learn from the myth of Atlantis?

One of the strongest and most compelling messages in Plato’s dialogues, Timaeus and Critias, was about human nature. He uses his former teacher Socrates as the pivotal character in his dialogues, to question the students on many facets of life. In a way, Socrates is the moral compass in the story by which his words of wisdom seek to provoke and elicit thoughtful responses. This oratorical strategy no doubt would have compelled and evoked passionate discussions, which could also be the reason why Plato did not finish the dialogue of Critias.critias

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Masters of Engineering

According to legend, Atlantis was renowned for its buildings and unusual formation of the island. In his dialogue Critias, Plato goes to extreme lengths to describe features of the island and important buildings. Many of these mirror the island of Santorini and the palaces found on Crete. The skill of engineering and architecture of Atlantis and that on the two islands was superior. The palace at Knossos is an impressive site. Much bigger than I expected when I visited 11 years ago and walking along the old Royal roads that connected the many palaces on the island was an experience I’ll never forget.

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