Fatal Lust, Fatal Consequences

‘What is left when honour is lost?’
Publilius Syrus

To love and be loved is the greatest desire every person hopes to have. It is human nature, written in our DNA since the conception of people. The image of stone-age man dragging a female by her hair, whether correct hypothesis or not, is a scene a few may recognise. The point is love is an illogical emotion, it makes people do things they may not normally do. Maslow understood this as he ranked it as number 3 on his hierarchy of need:

• Social Needs – belongingness, affection and love, – from work group, family, friends, romantic relationships.

He believed people are ‘motivated to achieve certain needs’ and when you succeed that level you move onto the next. So was Paris motivated by need or the desire to possess the most beautiful woman in the world?

Enrique Simonet (1866–1927)  Spanish: El juicio de Paris The Judgement of Paris The painting shows the Judgment of Paris, an event in Greek mythology. Figures, from left to right: The goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite, then Aphrodite's son, Eros, and Paris. 1904 Museum of Málaga  Wikimedia

Enrique Simonet (1866–1927)
Spanish: El juicio de Paris
The Judgement of Paris
The painting shows the Judgment of Paris, an event in Greek mythology. Figures, from left to right: The goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite, then Aphrodite’s son, Eros, and Paris.
1904
Museum of Málaga
Wikimedia

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Heroic Virtues Don’t Always Win

The ability to inspire and encourage others is a characteristic not many people possess. Some are born with it, a few have to work hard to develop the skill and then there are those who believe who can but have no idea how to lead. Agamemnon is the perfect example of the latter. He ruled by force and show of power. He certainly did not evoke loyalty or a harmonious union. Hektor, Troy’s greatest fighter and hero put the defence of his city and people before his own personal needs. For his bravery and virtue, he was Troy’s favoured and most respected son.

Triumphant Achilles: Achilles dragging the dead body of Hector in front of the gates of Troy. The original painting is a fresco on the upper level of the main hall of the Achilleion at Corfu, Greece. Franz von Matsch (1861–1942)  Wikimedia

Triumphant Achilles: Achilles dragging the dead body of Hector in front of the gates of Troy. The original painting is a fresco on the upper level of the main hall of the Achilleion at Corfu, Greece.
Franz von Matsch (1861–1942)
Wikimedia

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Scapegoat or Femme Fatale

Women since the dawn of time, have been labelled, scorned, vilified or regarded as ball-busters if they show strength. Throughout history there have been numerous examples where women were condemned: Helen of Sparta, Nefertiti, Cleopatra, Joan of Arc, Mata Hari, Marilyn Monroe to just name a few. The question one has to ask is why? They’re all famous whether by chance or choice for their actions. Or was it simply the male ego, bruised and beaten because of the strength of their character?

Let’s look at Helen of Sparta and Mata Hari; both have intriguing mythologies because of their mystique and sexuality.
Each was condemned for perceived actions/behaviour: Helen who supposedly had an affair with a foreign prince that precipitated a war; and Mata Hari, an exotic dancer who was regarded as a double-agent during World War 1.

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Now on Sale: The Curse of Troy

Hello dear friends,
The day has finally arrived! The Curse of Troy is now uploaded and available to purchase.

Blurb

Helen of Troy! The most beautiful woman in the world. Her face launched a thousand ships. Betrayal, greed and power unfold in this compelling Greek tragedy. It was a war renowned throughout times gone by as the greatest and bloodiest of them all. It was a romance between two star-crossed lovers. Helen, Queen of Sparta, home-wrecker and whore, flees with her lover Paris, Prince of Troy… That’s the story known to history.

But is this all true? History is told by the victors, and facts can be changed to twist the truth. Is it possible Helen of Sparta never went to Troy? Could she be a scapegoat in a devious plan and organised by the power hungry Agamemnon?

Perhaps. This is Helen’s story in her words, as told to a wandering historian.

HelenAmazon US $1.99
Amazon UK £1.28
Kobo CAD $1.96
Smashwords US $1.99

Review for The Curse of Troy

The author has told a story worthy of a full novel with a well-accomplished suspense and anticipation.  It leaves the reader wishing for more.
Anne Marie Webster, Author Just Deserts and Jack the Lad and other stories

Click here for the full review.

Book Cover Reveal – Results

Thank you all so much for participating and voting for your favourite cover Book Cover Reveal. It was a wonderful response and a big thank you to those who commented. I have a few ideas as per suggestions for my next story and book cover.

Now for the results!

74% voted for…

Book Cover 1

Helen

Look out for the release of The Curse of Troy on 10 January 2013 with the most voted for cover on Amazon, Smashwords and Kobo.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has visited my blog over the year. You are all wonderful. 2013 is looking to be a big year so please drop in. You are all welcome.

Thank_You_Spiral_wo_heart_black1

The Next Big Thing Blog Tour – The Curse of Troy

I would like to thank A.M. Day for inviting me to participate in this blog tour. Aletha is the author of The Throne of Olympus Book One: Blood Bond and now available on Amazon in print and as an eBook. She lives in Wisconsin with her children and their dog Simi. She has dreamed of being a writer since a small child once seeing the stage production of A Christmas Carol at the Chicago Goodman Theatre. Throne of Olympus is her debut novel and is about how two mortals become a modern-day Zeus and Hera, reviving Mt. Olympus, protecting it and the throne from the impending enemy takeover by the “Unworthy” descendants of the Greek gods.

1. What is the working title of your book?
The Curse of Troy

2. Where did the idea come from for your book?
I was writing Aphrodite’s Curse when I had light bulb moment. A series of short stories with a female protagonist, from Greek mythology and, the dilemmas they’ve had to endure. My character is Helen, who’s been written, filmed and drawn about more times than I can count since her inception in Homer’s Iliad. I wanted to hear a different story about the legend surrounding the Trojan War, so I wrote one.

3. What genre does your book fall under?
Historical Fantasy but can be considered as Epic Fiction.

4. Which actors would you choose to play in your movie rendition?
It would be interesting to see in a movie, with plenty of flashbacks. There are two main characters in this story: Helen and the travelling historian.

For the role of Helen I would cast Kate Beckingsale because of her ability to play strong leading females and yet be feminine; and for the young historian I would choose Jake Gyllenhaal mainly for his bookish appearance yet nice physique.

5. What is the one sentence synopsis of your book?
The Curse of Troy is the untold story of a woman’s fall from favour, the quest for supremacy and immortality.

6. Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?
Self-published on Amazon, Smashwords and Kobo.

Book launch: date 10 January 2013. Write it down so you don’t forget!

7. How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?
It took about four weeks.

8. What other books would you compare this story to?
Books by Mary Renault, David Gemmell, Margaret George’s Helen of Troy

9. Who or what inspired you to write the book?
Bettany Hughes book Helen of Troy, and Homer’s Iliad. Also I love Greek mythology and ancient history. The honour I have is re-telling ancient myths, to have people read them and grow to love them as much as I do.

10. What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?
It is an alternative tale on the legend of The Iliad and subsequent stories that have been written since. We will never know the real truth behind the story and of those who featured prominently in the Homeric tales. I wanted to tell Helen’s story and give her voice. It was her turn to let us know what really happened.

Check out the answers these wonderful storytellers share on their blogs next week, 26th December.

Emily Guido

Julie Hicks

J.M. McDowell

Joshua Dwyer

Maggie Cammiss