Merry Christmas

Wow, this year flown by! I am not sure what or how that happened, but here we are at the end of another year. If you still need to buy a gift or even for yourself, a book is always a nice present to buy for family and friends, especially if you’re not sure what to give them. And so, for a limited time, I have a Christmas deal.

TLJ

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An interview with Jacqui Murray and me!

Today, I have the great pleasure to introduce you to Jacqui Murray, author of the popular book Building a midshipman and her Rowe-Delamagente thriller series. She has recently published a spin-off series about Lucy, a homo sapien, and her plight to survive the harsh conditions of a pre-historic world. I have read Jacqui’s books and highly recommend them if you enjoy thrillers that have a Covert Affairs edge to them (TV series about a CIA agent for those who haven’t watched it) and a great adventure the reader experiences through Lucy’s point of view.

Come along and join us for a reciprocal interview. It was a lot of fun.

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Writing Update

It has been a while since I’ve written one of these, and it’s been two years since the publication of Search for the Golden Serpent. This is the reason why I started a blog, to showcase my writing, share my passion for ancient history and to support fellow indie writers. So today, I am going to let you know what I’ve been writing, or rather struggling to write, as in finding time!

Pencil this date into your diaries
1st October 2017

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What did the Phoenicians eat?

Origins
The Phoenicians lived in northern ancient Canaan, where Lebanon is today. They were considered to be Canaanites, yet recent DNA evidence of Modern Lebanese, a study conducted by the National Geographic,  suggest they came from an ancient Mediterranean sub-stratum. What does this mean? The results showed their bloodline are of mixed origin and were not indigenous to the area. It could be the Phoenicians were related to the ‘sea people’, having migrated in the 3rd millennium BCE and mixed with the local Canaanites and hence the Phoenician line was born. You can read more here.

Phoenician trade routes Image courtesy of Wikipedia

Phoenician trade routes
Image courtesy of Wikipedia

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Goodbye 2016

I thought it was time to reflect on the year that was 2016. I haven’t written an article as such before, so here we go. 2016 was a roller-coaster and so to close the year out, here are some pivotal events that happened.

The year started very promising, I had started a new job and was working in two schools. It was hectic going from one school to the other, but I made it work. My new line-manager then offered extra days, which meant resigning from the other school. That was fine as I was travelling an hour and half each way to get there.

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Results from Readers’ Survey – Part 2

Here we are, the remainder of the results from the survey.

Question 7: Do you prefer to read:
I gave people the option to choose more than one answer as I know I read both print and eBooks. There was only a 3% difference between paperback (53%) and eBooks (50%) and hardback wasn’t far behind with (45%). This does show people do prefer printed books over digital, which also goes to the statistics given last year with regards to the increase of sales in printed books and a decline in eBooks. The availability of both formats is good as it meets the demands for those who prefer one or the other or both. And really, once the genie is out of the bottle, you can’t put the stopper back on.

preference

Question 8: When do you usually read?
This had a good spread of answers but no real surprises. Most people like to read at home (82%), and before they go to bed (73%). Some like to read at work (14%), which I am guessing is during their lunch break. 41% like to read in the morning, 18% read at midday, while 32% read in the afternoon. No one read while cooking, except perhaps when you read a recipe.

when do you read

Question 9: How much would you pay for an eBook written by an Indie Author?
This also had a fair spread of responses; the ones that didn’t make the cut was $7.99 and $8.99. It was interesting to see what people were willing to pay, with most saying 99c (62%), a tie between $1.99-$2.99 (57%), then 48% for $3.99 and 43% for $4.99. This is most helpful as it gives me a guideline for pricing eBooks.

how much pay for indie book

The next three questions were more of a personal nature, as I wanted to gauge interest in the books I write. I wasn’t offended by the answers as everyone has different tastes and to be honest, there are genres I don’t read.

Question 10: Would you buy my books?
95% of the responses said they would buy my books and 5% said they would not.

buy my books

Question 11: How much would you pay for my eBooks?
The answers to this question was a nice surprise and again helpful when I come to pricing my books. 24% said they’d be happy to pay $4.99, followed by $1.99 (19%), $5.99 and $3.99 (14%), $2.99 and $9.99 (10%) and 5% would pay $6.99/$8.99. The distribution is diverse but gives me a good indication of what people will pay.

how much pay for my books

Question 12: Have you read my books?
Of the survey respondents, 73% had read my books, while 27% had not.

Overall, the survey did provide the answers I wanted to know more about. I may revisit the survey sometime later in the year, and hopefully get a larger pool of responses. I also want to thank those who did take the time to complete the survey, I am most grateful. You have given me a lot of good information for me to consider especially when I launch my next book/s.

Thanks for visiting and reading. If you have any questions regarding the survey or would like further clarity, please leave a comment below.